Niche Fragrance Magazine

Reviews

Al Waad (Promise) by Dominique Ropion for Frederic Malle

The ad copy for Al Waad (Promise) by perfumer Dominique Ropion for Les Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle reads as follows:

“Frédéric Malle celebrates two precious varieties of rose in the Promise Eau de Parfum.

A harmonious blend of rose essence from Bulgaria and rose absolute from Turkey are lifted by apple, pink pepper and clove, and bound to a sensuous base of patchouli, cypriol and labdanum for a truly unbreakable accord.”

I agree with the “truly unbreakable accord” bit. I sprayed this on at 2pm yesterday and as of 2pm today, Promise is still there. But while one can’t argue with its performance, I’m ambivalent about whether it’s outstayed its welcome on the piece of skin real estate stretching from my right wrist to inner elbow. KEEP ON READING

Creed Viking: Lost at sea or ready to capture the world?

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Upon spraying Viking, I get an intense lavender note. It’s spicy and immediately reminds me of fougeres of yesteryears. Within the first 20 minutes, the lavender and peppercorn/pink pepper subside, at which point citrus/bergamot lightens the mood. The heart of Viking is seemingly the most unisex aspect of a relatively “masculine” offering. It’s where the rose emerges and a creamy sandalwood. (Think Cartier Declaration d’un Soir with a toned down rose note) The dry down is where the magic happens, albeit in a POST-IFRA chop shop, world. I’m met with oak moss, sandalwood, patchouli, and persistent lavender. KEEP ON READING

Summers in Paris: Creed’s Original Vetiver

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Of all my summer fragrances, only one takes me straight to France. The whimsical, white columns and sculptures of Paris are only done justice by sartorial elegance with a bit of flair, which is exactly what Creed does best. Look no further than Creed’s Original Vetiver, which (contrary to popular opinion) is both heavy on the vetiver and quite original.

Based solely on the opening, Original Vetiver does smell similar to Mugler’s Cologne, a fragrance that is sometimes heralded as the “original” Original Vetiver merely because it was released a few years earlier. But while there is a similarity of style and genre, these fragrances are quite different. Original Vetiver is significantly more expensive, but is worth the premium if you like the style. Where Mugler Cologne is extremely heavy on the musks and fresh citruses/neroli, Original Vetiver has more complexity since it incorporates several textures at once. KEEP ON READING

Sheep ruh

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Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

I can never see the first changing colours in the hedgerows without Keats’ poem coming to mind. As I drove to work today through the English countryside, I saw a blush on a beech and a flame on a poplar, as the mists rose off the river Wye. The time has come to put away the coconut, tiare, white flowers and aquatic accords and get sheepish. OK, I mean chyprish, but allow me the pun. KEEP ON READING

My Sainted Aunt, sugar

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I don’t often comment on the packaging of fragrances, being greedy to get into the bottle and sniff, but in this case I feel I must.
Josh Meyer at Imaginary Authors goes all-out to create a world around each of his fragrances, which you slip into from the moment you pick them up. My travel spray of Saint Julep arrived in a mysterious box, banded with a beautiful intricate design that reminded me of late Victorian ‘gothic’ book illustrations.

I read the notes and descriptions of Saint Julep, to immerse myself in the world of Milton Nevers. He is the imaginary author whose quotes are sprinkled into this packaging and across the company’s website – well worth a look, by the way, for its melding of perfume, art, and eccentric inventiveness. Imaginary Authors is a brand build on a concept, and they achieve it very well. Each fragrance in the range is intended to embody a novel, bring it to life and immerse you in the sights, scents and sounds of the story. Now, I could imagine what I think Moby Dick smells like (aquatic accord and ambergris, no?) but you might have a different opinion. Which is why these books and their authors are imaginary, and the fragrance that epitomises them and brings them to life is created by Josh Meyer in Oregon. He has a remarkable imagination. KEEP ON READING

2017 Summer Favorites

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When it comes to wearing fragrance, summer is my favorite season. Maybe it is my taste, or the fact that I live in a hot, dry climate, but when I am out in public under the blazing sun, I’d much, MUCH rather smell summer fragrances. On those days, sweet scents can smell too sticky and gross, and spicy scents can smell like cumin-tinged sweat in the heat. But those summery citruses and florals, oh my… THOSE can be beautiful. Here are some favorites that I’ve been enjoying in Summer 2017: KEEP ON READING

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