Niche Fragrance Magazine

Reviews

Waters + Wild: Cedarwood & Cognac

One of the reasons that I enjoy my frequent travels to Ireland is the olfactory delights that greet me on the Emerald isle, particularly in the west of the country, where earth meets water meets sky on a daily basis. The lush green grasses, ferns and trees that can be found from its rich soil, the salty and ‘seaweedy’ air emanating from the rocky or sandy coastline, and the water that permeates absolutely everything (having once asked how frequently it rains in Ireland, I was told one can experience each of the four seasons every day in Ireland…although all of them involve rain).

Wear a leather jacket

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It’s getting chillier and after my last post about Chypres, I started thinking about other categories of fragrance that might be good at this time of year. It’s the perfect time of year to re-organise your cupboards for a new season and bring out the leather.

Leather fragrances, like chypres, hark back to the age of glamour and romance, summed up by the classic movies of the 40s, 50s and 60s. Can’t you picture Cary Grant or Kathryn Hepburn wise-cracking and arching an eyebrow sardonically while wearing crisp tailoring and smelling elegantly of leather with a faint hint of roses or sandalwood? KEEP ON READING

Sample Impressions: Bond no. 9’s Sutton Place

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Recently Bond has been gaining a lot of positive press in the fragrance forums. In particular, Bleecker Street has become a bit of a hot commodity, and through Bleecker, many enthusiasts are discovering their other offerings.

Enter Sutton Place, a hypermodern Bond no.9 fragrance with a bottle that won’t give children nightmares. Admittedly, when I first saw the bottle and description of this fragrance, I knew that I had to get my hands on a sample.

Surprisingly, it turns out that the refined, masculine bottle fits the character of this fragrance. Before reading the sample, I read on the forums that it smells like Aventus (why does everything have to smell like Aventus?). As usual, this fragrance doesn’t smell like Aventus. And there is no actual similarity except for the vanillic and fruity elements. KEEP ON READING

Creed Viking: Lost at sea or ready to capture the world?

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Upon spraying Viking, I get an intense lavender note. It’s spicy and immediately reminds me of fougeres of yesteryears. Within the first 20 minutes, the lavender and peppercorn/pink pepper subside, at which point citrus/bergamot lightens the mood. The heart of Viking is seemingly the most unisex aspect of a relatively “masculine” offering. It’s where the rose emerges and a creamy sandalwood. (Think Cartier Declaration d’un Soir with a toned down rose note) The dry down is where the magic happens, albeit in a POST-IFRA chop shop, world. I’m met with oak moss, sandalwood, patchouli, and persistent lavender. KEEP ON READING

Summers in Paris: Creed’s Original Vetiver

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Of all my summer fragrances, only one takes me straight to France. The whimsical, white columns and sculptures of Paris are only done justice by sartorial elegance with a bit of flair, which is exactly what Creed does best. Look no further than Creed’s Original Vetiver, which (contrary to popular opinion) is both heavy on the vetiver and quite original.

Based solely on the opening, Original Vetiver does smell similar to Mugler’s Cologne, a fragrance that is sometimes heralded as the “original” Original Vetiver merely because it was released a few years earlier. But while there is a similarity of style and genre, these fragrances are quite different. Original Vetiver is significantly more expensive, but is worth the premium if you like the style. Where Mugler Cologne is extremely heavy on the musks and fresh citruses/neroli, Original Vetiver has more complexity since it incorporates several textures at once. KEEP ON READING

Sheep ruh

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Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.

I can never see the first changing colours in the hedgerows without Keats’ poem coming to mind. As I drove to work today through the English countryside, I saw a blush on a beech and a flame on a poplar, as the mists rose off the river Wye. The time has come to put away the coconut, tiare, white flowers and aquatic accords and get sheepish. OK, I mean chyprish, but allow me the pun. KEEP ON READING

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