Niche Fragrance Magazine

Creed Acqua Originale - Iris Tuberose

Like a painting by Monet: Creed Iris Tuberose

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Creed debuted recently a new collection of fragrances named Acqua Originale that captures some of the finest raw materials from around the world. The house created also a new design for the bottles of this special range, continuing the long-time partnership with Pochet de Courval, a luxury French glass bottle manufacturer, and the exquisitely shaped heavy glass flacons are a pleasure for the eye.

Because I have a soft spot for florals, the first one I chose to investigate was Iris Tuberose. The official olfactive pyramid shows it contains the following ingredients:

Top: French galbanum, tender violet leaf and orange

Heart: Indian tuberose, ylang-ylang and lilly of the valley

Base: Sicilian orange blossom, musk and Mexican vanilla orchid

Irises in Monets Garden

Irises in Monet`s Garden (1900)

In the opening the fragrance seems to capture the atmosphere of a foggy flower garden in the early hours of the day. The air is humid and pure and you become aware of a delicate mixture of flowers around you. Slowly the fog goes up living the first sun rays to warm the garden. I get a crispy green floral tone in the first minutes that reminds me of the smell of hyacinth, very close to the one you can feel in Serge Lutens Bas de Soie, a bit sharp and metallic, but as this flower is not listed here, it could be just the multifaceted essence of iris playing tricks with my nose. The scent starts somehow cold but it transforms this aspect over time, not becoming very warm either, but definitely much more approachable. Not one pronounced whiff of woods or resins here that add in other cases an extra force to a delicate floral core, just pure floral beauty from top to bottom and even the musk that peeks in the base is very reduced and shy, so the flowers have the privilege to play in the spotlight.

Even if the bouquet is smoothly blended, the pale blue iris seems slightly taller then the rest of the flowers, enveloping them with an earthy powdery scent. The iris here is not buttery at all, nor dense or creamy, it firmly rules the scent sitting on top of the composition like a serene sovereign. This kind of iris I found recently only in Xerjoff Ibitira which is also highly recommendable if you are looking for an “out of this world” beautiul iris, gentle and uncommon. Everybody seems interested to accentuate a sweet-creamy kind of iris that produces an almost gourmand facet, but a tender one like this is rare and desired. The tuberose is outlined here as well, but also not too strong, having just a soapy-green-dusty appearance, only suggested and never brought in front. The scent remains floral-fresh, developing clean, feminine and slightly sweet over time, thanks to the orange blossoms which infuses later the mixture with a cheerful and sunny smell. Iris Tuberose projects at close distance from the skin, so that you have to embrace the person who wears it in order to feel the scent. It glitters in summer days, being also a perfect choice as a wedding scent.

IrisTubereuse

 

Hi, my name is Raluca! I am born in Romania and live in Switzerland for many years. I love perfumes since I was a little girl and now I am an avid perfume collector and totally dedicated to the amazing world of essences. I am always looking for something new and interesting to discover and among my personal preferences are the delicate and powdery notes, but also some bold orientals. I admire both clasic and niche fragrances with a special twist in them. A good perfume for me should be able to put me in a special mood, to complete and inspire me…things I need when I paint or do photography, my other two passions.

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