Niche Fragrance Magazine

Tag archive

Comme des Garçons

Fireworks on snow: Chanel No.22

in Reviews by

For Party People, New Year’s Eve is the night to break out the bling, leopard print and high heels and souse yourself like a herring with the most delightful scents you own – and that’s just the gents. If you prefer to stay home and go into hygge-overload, which has a lot of merits too, I still think you should be fragranced to the hilt – what could be more cosy?

Recently I luxuriated in the utterly snuggly Dr Zhivago fur hat, vodka and tobacco of Parfum d’Empire’s Ambre Russe, which has left a warm deliciousness on my coat collar I’m still smelling a week later. This transference and longevity makes it a sneakily clever party fragrance as well as a hygge hero, because everyone you hug hello will smell of you for the next week. I had a huge bearhug from my fragrant Uncle M over the holidays that left my scarf trailing Eau Sauvage for a few days, and every time I caught a whiff I thought of my lovely uncle, who I don’t see often enough. KEEP ON READING

Rundholz 03.Apr.1968: Stollen-Infused Incense

in Reviews by

I’ve absolutely fallen in love with Rundholz 03.Apr.1968, which I guess shouldn’t surprise me since I also fell hard for al02 by biehl parfumkunstwerke, by the same perfumer, Arturetto Landi. This is obviously a perfumer who likes to balance out bitter resins with mulled wine and stewed fruits. I bet he is the kind of man who would never take his morning espresso without something dolce on the side, an amaretto or a ricciarello perhaps. My kind of man, in other words.

What Landi has done with 03.Apr.1968 is to take the minimalist structure of church incense and flesh it out with a gaudy array of rich, bitter, and tooth-rottingly sweet flavors. It smells like a fat wodge of Christmas cake doused in brandy and set to burn on a priest’s censer alongside a hulking lump of frankincense. Underneath these smoky, soiled-fruit aromas, there is an enticing whiff of heliotrope, a huge purple chunk of marzipan charred at the edges. Smoke fights with burned sugar, and we all win. KEEP ON READING

Tea with (smelly) friends

in Thoughts by

Two weekends ago I went to London with a good friend I’ve known since I was in my 20s – that’s her in the photo with me – Sam who writes the I Scent You A Day blog. We went to hang out and drink tea with a group of perhaps twenty people, many of whom we hadn’t physically met before. What did we have in common? Perfume. How did we know these people? The internet.

Now some people get upset when I refer to them as Smelly Friends, so I may need to use some other terminology, such as Fragonerds, Perfumistas and Perfumisters, or just fragrance afficionados, but it all boils down to the same thing. We are people who love perfume. You, dear reader, may very well be one too. KEEP ON READING

Beauty and the Beast: M/Mink and Teint de Neige

in Reviews by

M/Mink by Byredo

A while ago, I wrote an article for Basenotes on the top ten niche fragrances that every beginner should sample. I got one comment from a guy that I must repeat here because it is (a) very funny, and (b) kind of indicative of how people perceive my, or other people’s taste. The comment read as follows:

“I don’t agree with the entirety of this list. It is not well-rounded at all. It seems this amazing writer has a fetish for burning rubber, smoking resins or charred flesh/leather with squirt of stale urine. I’m pretty sure there are some amazing niche fragrances that are on the more comforting, clean, snuggly, socially appropriate and less “trying so hard to smell like I don’t try (or shower) at all.” KEEP ON READING

Comme des Garcons Black: Home Fires Burning

in Reviews by
Reaching through the smoke images – Photography images

I left Ireland for Bosnia when I was 22, without so much as a backwards glance. Over the following 16 years when people asked me if I missed home, I would always be startled and say yes – automatically – but it wasn’t quite true. I just never thought of home as being anywhere other than wherever I was right then.

I never realized that the gene for “home” was carried deep within my DNA until one dark night when I stepped out of a snow-stalled car into the deserted crossroads of a tiny village in Bosnia and was hit in the solar plexus by a waft of smoke from a coal fire. KEEP ON READING

Intelligent Fruity Fragrances for Summer

in Reviews by

The Perfect Mango Cocktail: Bombay Bling! by Neela Vermeire

A charming summer fling that’s not as ditsy as it sounds.

Bombay Bling! opens up on a charming, fizzy note of effervescent mango, lime, and what feels to me to be stone fruit – either plums or peaches. The fruity top notes act together to form the impression of a dollop of jammy, intense fruit puree added to a glass of champagne. It is incredibly buoyant and cheerful. At this stage, I have to say that it is slightly too fruity and too sweet for my taste. What saves this perfume, for me, is the creamy sandalwood and cedar base, which rises up to support and soften the piquant, acidic red and orange fruits up top after a couple of hours. The effect is to mellow and soften the entire composition, making the dry down comfortable and luxurious. KEEP ON READING

If You Go Down to the Woods Today: A Round-Up of Good Woods

in Reviews by
It\'s 4:20 at the Teddy Bear Picnic Kristine Kristan / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

Omer Pekji is one hell of a talented perfumer. I have been working my way through his pack of samples since March, and even though there are only five of them, they are the kind of perfumes you have to take your time with. Not because they are inaccessible – far from it – but because each of the perfumes is such a clear statement on each of the categories he has taken on (woods, incense, aquatic, leather, and oriental) that it forces you to think about everything the perfumer must have included and excluded on his way to finish the perfume. KEEP ON READING

Italian style-the Angela Ciampagna line of fragrances:an overview

in Reviews by

image

Let’s talk numbers today: there are at least 360 niche perfume brands on the market presently, as opposed to about 100 less than 10 years ago, according to a press article published on the Reuters website in 2014.
The competition is getting hotter by the day and any newly launched brands would better have a very coherent and believable artistic statement behind and some damn good perfumes in order to establish a successful presence on the market. Brilliant customer service and an engaging online presence are playing an important part too.
Consumers are also getting more discerning thanks to the increasing amount of information available, especially the customers that are active buyers of niche perfumes, a term that I dislike for his pretentious connotations, but it’s sort of universally used and accepted so in lack of a better alternative it’ll have to do. KEEP ON READING

Comme des Garçons – Series 2: Red – Harissa

in Reviews by


Harissa
This one has been around for a while, it was launched in 2001. Based on the  famous fiery Moroccan spice of the same name, Harissa starts off with a spicy tomato note, but you are not going to smell like your favorite salsa. I find the tomato accent not really that pronounced. It’s more the fruity (blood orange) aspect that comes across to my nose. It is warm and spicy yet fruity without being overly sweet.

Much more of a complex mix than a lot of the light fruit basket fragrances that seem to had the fragrance market covered at some stage. I personally very much like the orange/pepper heart note that does last sufficiently long on my skin before the heavier spice base notes set in (cardamom, nutmeg). I can still smell the fresh leaf/fruit note even that far into the fragrance, whereas those usually disappear fairly quickly. KEEP ON READING

Balsamo della Mecca: A Pilgrim’s Rest

in Reviews/Thoughts by

Does the intent of the perfumer when making a perfume matter to us? If so, do we subconsciously allow it to color the way we experience the perfume? These are questions I ask myself whenever I put on Balsamo della Mecca, by La Via del Profumo.

The intent here of the perfumer was clearly to imply devotional pilgrimage. The very name of the perfume (Mecca Balsam) suggests that this is an ancient salve to weary pilgrims on a religious mission. Somewhere, I read that Dominique Dubrana, or Abdes Salaam Attar as he is better known, wanted Balsamo della Mecca to capture the scent roiling in the wake of the hundreds of thousands of dusty pilgrims circling the sacred Ka’aba on their hajj in Mecca, chief among them the smell of frankincense, labdanum resin, and tobacco. KEEP ON READING

Sideris by Maria Gentile Candida: Fairy Dust

in Reviews by

It’s impossible to talk about Maria Candida Gentile’s Sideris without a smile. If Tinkerbell and the Archangel Gabriel got together to make a perfume, Sideris is what they would come up with.

Two things are important to mention here – radiance and scale. In terms of radiance, Maria Candida Gentile has somehow managed to take the heaviest and stickiest substances in perfumery – French labdanum, incense, myrrh, beeswax – and infuse the whole thing with light and air. This is a perfume that radiates. It glows. In fact, what hits you first, when you spray it on, is this incredible note of powdered sugar, the result of a very hazy, diffuse mix of incense and rose. This powdered sugar note coats the entire perfume from head to toe, a sort of fairy dust sifted over the heavier resins. A gentle shake of the spice jar – pepper and ginger – add to the sprightly, nose-tingling effect. The dust is finally anchored and settled at the base by creamy woods. KEEP ON READING

Black Saffron: Fruit Leather with Volume Control Problems

in Reviews by

Black Saffron by Byredo

Black Saffron is not what I expected at all. In fact, when my nose was hit with a burst of fruit syrup notes, I had to check the box that my sample came in twice. Yep – the words “black” and “saffron” were definitely there. But before I even had a chance to reach up to scratch my head in puzzlement, the scent did a crazy volte face. What I smelled was….. wood shavings in a heated, covered horse-riding arena. How odd! This eventually settled into a fine dusting of sawdust that coated the main accord of the scent – fruity violet leather – giving the entire fragrance an unusual kind of musky, ashy “mouthfeel”. Although I assume the dustiness is due to the saffron, I was unable to detect any of that spice’s usual medicinal aspects. In fact, despite the presence of both saffron and juniper berries, I was unable to pick up much spiciness at all. Here, they seem to manifest themselves more as a textural component (ash, dust) than as a flavoring agent. KEEP ON READING

Pin It on Pinterest

GET OUR FREE EBOOK NOW!

Subscribe to our Newsletter and grab your  free eBook copy of "PERFUME 101 - From Beginner to Aficionado" by Fragrance Daily Author Claire Vukcevic now!

Fragrance Daily eBook Cover

YAY! You subscribed successfully and became part of the growing FD cult!

Go to Top