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Andy Tauer’s Lonestar Memories

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We’re all excited here at Fragrance Daily for the arrival of precious samples of the new Andy Tauer release, Lonesome Rider. Over the next week or so, there will be a series of takes on this new scent by a few of our contributing writers, so keep tuned to this site! In the meantime, though, I thought we’d take a look back at one of the classics in Andy Tauer’s line, namely Lonestar Memories, because this fragrance was the starting point for the Lonesome Rider.

In his WordPress blog created for the purpose of launching Lonesome Rider, Andy mentioned that Lonestar Memories was  “[A] scent that captures elements of untrimmed leather, campfire and the scent of wild pastures. A smoky leather note is what I wanted to see in Lonesome Rider, too. To me, this feels like going back to the source. I want the Lonesome Rider to stand out of the crowd. Thus, there’s an element of rough texture that I love so much. The smoke note is civilized, the leather warm and feels like a worn leather jacket.”

Lonesome Rider is said to add a metallic, sharp orris note to the Lonestar Memories skeleton, among other notes such as rose, black pepper, woods, and a touch of castoreum for a subtle animalic touch. But let’s rewind a bit and look at Lonestar Memories, shall we?

Lonestar Memories features an almost overpowering smoky leather note at the beginning, like a leather jacket tossed onto a campfire. Its black, rubbery thrust might seem too monolithic were it not for the minty geranium leaf and an orangey myrrh shooting though it, letting down the density of the smoke to an acceptable level. The opening is thrilling and evocative, but there’s no beating around the bush here – it’s wild enough to scare the horses.

But Lonestar Memories isn’t a perfume built purely on the shock value of its topnotes. The smoke note here is rich, full, and rubbed with sage, so despite the general industrial bent to the leather note (tar, creosote, tarpaulins, motor engine oil), there is a refreshing whiff of the great outdoors too. It’s a macho, dry perfume built on a HUMONGOUS scale, as broad in scope as a prairie. A fragrance for dreamers and wanderers.

But for me, Lonestar Memories only really hits its stride when it enters the dry down. The smoke note settles, and becomes just one more layer in the rich leather, a tiny prickle of birch tar there to remind us that this is no ladies’ glove type of leather. There is real beauty in the quality of the myrrh here. It is soapy, antiseptic and slightly bitter in that black, oily way that myrrh oil is, so one gets the pleasant impression of having washed one’s hands with coal tar soap. If you are someone like me who grew up with that soap, then this stage will be a real rush to the head. It also has a licorice-like facet to it.

Teamed with the smoky but now smooth leather, and a gummy floral note (jasmine?), the myrrh provides a shot of almost bitter soapiness that reads as very necessary against the white, creamy amber in the background. The opening is riveting, but the delicious, long dry down is what keeps me coming back for more.

Would I buy a bottle? Probably not. Not because I don’t think it is beautiful or striking, because I do, but because it is such a strongly “environmental” fragrance, by which I mean that it conjures up an entire slice of Americana – a prairie, a dust bowl, a tire shop with oily mechanics – and so I feel it doesn’t really fit in with the type of life I lead. But I treasure my sample of it.  Now, rather than wearing it on my skin, I prefer to soak a blotter in Lonestar Memories and place it into my jeans pocket or underneath the desk lamp in my office so that I can enjoy its rich, smoky, cowboy-chaps scent all day long without the commitment of skin time. Perfect.

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My name is Claire, I'm a 39-year old mother of two, and I am a freelance writer and consultant. I love perfume, any perfume, practically all of 'em. Other interests such as writing, reading, and painting fall tragically behind the perfume. It's a hobby that tends to be all-consuming (of both my time and my money).

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